"RAM Vs. BABUR" - An architectural solution to resolve the crisis
"RAM Vs. BABUR" - An architectural solution to resolve the crisis: Left: East Elevatoin [Mosque seen through the Shikhara], Right-top: Profiles of Shikhara, Minaret and Mosque Dome in open steel frames, Right-bottom: Plan, ("Open below dome" - security, janitor, sub-station, water pump - "Open below shikhara") 'Inspired by Dr Radhakrishnan's poem to my son Ram Rahman — Ram Rahman tere nam – Mandir Masjid tere dham"'  © Habib Rahman

No religion approves man killing man to sell, appease or protect God. Yet millions have been killed to propitiate God ever since he was created/invented by Man. Even today such killings continue from Ireland to the Philippines. 

Recently hundreds have lost their lives due to passions aroused by the Ram Janambhoomi and Babri mosque controversy. Fanatics and fundamentalists are above rationale, logic, human values and even law. 

Deep religious devotion and love for God inspired great art, music and architecture in the past. We are rightly proud of our great spiritual and cultural heritage. Today religion is devoid of spiritual values and artistic creativity - they are replaced by communal hatred, violence and greed. 

This insanity and communal frenzy must be stopped at any cost. The religious leaders, politicians and intellectuals must try and find a long-term solution through human, spiritual and cultural values. Why not take this opportunity to establish a nucleus for promoting communal harmony, understanding and religious tolerance by imparting knowledge of comparative religion on this volatile and disputed land around the Babri mosque? 

I suggest that the area be turned into a unique spiritual centre of all faiths with a beautiful modern temple, church, gurdwara, syna­gogue and prayer halls for all other religions. Also repair and reno­vate the Babri mosque and build a complex to house a school of comparative religion. 

This spiritual centre, the first of its kind in the world, should also be a complex of architectural beauty, a show piece that our future generations would be proud of. Temples, Mosques and churches built in India these days are usually extremely crude, unimaginative sometimes a comical imitation of our exquisite architectural her­itage. In the West hundreds of very beautiful modern churches have been built since World War I, that do not resemble the great church­es or cathedrals. A few beautiful modern mosques can also be seen in some Islamic countries. Why should we continue to build vulgar copies of our past glories? 

While my proposal would at first appear naive and utopian, it could appeal to some leader with a grand vision. And if there is a sincere and strong political will such a dream can become a reality. 

— Habib Rahman in The Statesman, July 28 (1990).