The exhibition Strung Course, life and work of C P Kukreja is 3rd in the series of Modern Indian Architects (MIA), an initiative of Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University where the Institute researches and disseminates the works of Modern Indian Architects after Independence.

Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 1969
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 1969: The campus aimed to be characterized by deep spatial and social values, realized through the design of a form reminiscent of the pride, self-efficiency, and earthly spirit of Modern India. This called for a superior design vision; of a modern structure impregnated with the value of learning and enlightenment, suited to characterize the image of Independent India. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 1969
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 1969: ‘When I started in 1972, I was drawn towards the warmth and human scale that exposed bricks projected. In addition, it is a material that is economical besides being ideally suited to our domestic architecture. From there, to the design of JNU situated on the rocky terrain, the use of brick as a natural material was an instinctive move.’ C.P. Kukreja (Architecture + Design, 1992) © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 1969
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 1969: The quality of residential spaces visualized for a university campus at that time was also path-breaking and revolutionary. In an era when campuses were designed with the notion that faculty housing and student hostels had to exist in clearly separated parts of the campus, JNU introduced the novel idea of creating 16 residential zones, each having a mix of 600 students and 100 faculty members to foster greater interaction and a quality of academic learning that extended beyond conventional clearances. A typical hostel in JNU houses 200 students in two linear, parallel wings. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 1969
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, 1969: A thousand-odd acres of rocky scrubby land make JNU and oasis of calm yet rugged beauty in a city. Its campus spreads out like a clam invitation to reflection and sociability and its students accept and cherish that aspect of JNU. Jahwahar Lal Nehru University is famous for its campus life and imaginative architecture has contributed to the involvement of students in campus life. The national competition for the architectural design attracted 68 prominent architects, C P Kukreja, the winner, designed the students and facility residences in appealing red brick which went well with the rocky nature of the terrain. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Lalit Hotel, New Delhi, 1988
Lalit Hotel, New Delhi, 1988: The facades follow a rhythmic grid-like pattern, punctuating the surface. The exteriors are designed in durable sandstone with fenestrations accentuated in red Agra stone introducing a volumetric play on the facades. The verticality of the building is balanced by establishing a grand elevated entrance area. This was achieved by extending the slab covering the drop to 15 m horizontally, as a bulk element. The coffered projection is used as a drop-off area for cars and buses, placed right at the entrance of the Hotel. The interiors exude an aura of finesse and luxury, resulting as a symphony of patterns and materials. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Silver Arch Apartments, New Delhi
Silver Arch Apartments, New Delhi: The luxury apartment complex is located in the green environs of Lutyens New Delhi. While the project has a maximum permissible built area, the eight-storeyed building form is sculpted to soften the built volume by creating a terraced form which recedes as it rises. Each of the forty-eight apartments is provided with a terrace that acts as a private, outdoor, multi-functional space and avoids the box like contained character generally associated with apartments © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Silver Arch Apartments, New Delhi
Silver Arch Apartments, New Delhi: "The Indian style cupolas (Chhatris) inspired by Lutyens architecture and a rich pattern of mosaic tiles on the facade lend a distinctive character" (sic!), ... located on a relatively compact site, extensive landscaping permeates the interiors of the building through a central atrium. Glass elevators, open staircases and movement areas overlooking the atrium are its main features. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Silver Arch Apartments, New Delhi
Silver Arch Apartments, New Delhi © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Indian Foreign Services Group Housing, New Delhi, 2003
Indian Foreign Services Group Housing, New Delhi, 2003: The complex houses 5 Towers of 8 floors each, providing space to house 210 units of flats. Each tower conjoins three U-shaped buildings looking outwards and sharing a common vertical circulation area with the stairwell. This project is a fine example of the use of exposed brickwork in High-rise Architecture designed in the early ’80s. All the external walls are constructed as cavity walls to reduce the heat and make the apartment interiors pleasant thereby reducing the energy loads in the project. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Amba Deep Towers, New Delhi, 1992
Amba Deep Towers, New Delhi, 1992: Amba Deep Towers, a 23 storied structure was designed to challenge the stereotype of high-rise commercial buildings in New Delhi. The Atrium of the tower is 7 stories in height, providing the visitors with one of the grandest urban scale entrances possible to an office building. Built in 1992, this was the first building in New Delhi to introduce glass elevators on its façade, providing a stunning panoramic view of the city. (bottom-left) Kukreja aimed at breaking the stereotype surrounding the design of high-rise buildings in and around the city. This was achieved by reinterpreting traditional Indian elements like courtyards and terraces in a modern style, providing a far more aesthetic alternative to the conventional refuge areas prescribed by the New Delhi fire norms.The architectural character of the building has been inspired from the exquisite Persian tile work, making Amba Deep one of the tallest buildings in the world to have an art mural engaging with the city, embracing art at a city level. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Amba Deep Towers, New Delhi, 1992
Amba Deep Towers, New Delhi, 1992: Perhaps a first example of such strong colours in a modern building of this scale the aesthetic evolved as a result of the architects conviction that the art compensates for the deprivation of a natural uplifting environment - the blocking of the sky, the sun, plants and trees - and that even a dense commercial area should be able to incorporate beauty and art and display it on a street facade. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Gyan Bharati School, New Delhi, 1980
Gyan Bharati School, New Delhi, 1980: The Gyan Bharati School experiments with varied geometries to create an interesting interplay between masses. Openings in the shapes of circles and semi-circles dominate the elevation, curving the buildings at their edges, playing with the masses of the buildings. This interplay between the varying geometries on the site creates an exuberant space for the children to engage with their ideas, whilst pursuing intellect and creativity. The harmony between solid and void is struck using recesses arches, sloping walls, sweeping pergolas and ramps. This school has a strength of over 2000 students, 64 classrooms, laboratories etc., all planned around the assembly court. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Gyan Bharati School, New Delhi, 1980
Gyan Bharati School, New Delhi, 1980: The building is a part of the earlier oeuvre of C P Kukreja’s s style where arched openings and exposed brick work were provided over the windows on the façade to create an association with the regions historic architectural heritage, particularly that of the Islamic Era. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Gyan Bharati School, New Delhi, 1980
Gyan Bharati School, New Delhi, 1980: The buildings are designed with brick as the prime material for construction. They are left exposed and are in tandem with the kind of post-modern Indian design sensibilities of the times. The façade imparts a rugged look to the Campus while also disguising as a low maintenance material. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Indian institute of Management, Lucknow, 1984
Indian institute of Management, Lucknow, 1984: The campus is an amalgamation of different enclosed and semi-enclosed spaces - courts, terraces, atriums, pavilions, colonnades which attempt to emulate the architectural character of Lucknow. The buildings have been set amidst landscaped gardens, integrating with the natural topography of the site. There are both, static and flowing water bodies, and the connections between the buildings are established through covered paths and criss-cross pathways, punctuated by common public spaces at intersecting intervals occurring between the buildings. The design for the institute was conceptualized to be solid and earthy. In addition, the climate of Lucknow also called for a climate-sensitive approach and was resolved by providing passive cooling and natural ventilation. Inspiration was also derived from Awadh architecture of the region that utilizes elements like false walls, double walls and networks of corridors inducing passive cooling and air circulation within all parts of the building efficiently. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Indian institute of Management, Lucknow, 1984
Indian institute of Management, Lucknow, 1984: To protect against the harsh hot dry summer, a second layer was introduced on the buildings. The outer wall with jaalis and rich indentations in the brickwork prevents the building envelope from being directly exposed and offers an interplay of light and shade. Kota stone which is a locally available material was used along with bricks, with occasional relief’s created with marble patterns. Such quality of aesthetics was achieved promising a low-cost construction. Exposed brickwork with Awadh reliefs was used in both exteriors and interiors through the entire campus comprising of Faculty Building, Classroom blocks, Library Building, Computer Centre, Administration building, Auditorium and Conference Centers, Hostels (for 2000 students) and faculty Residences (500 capacity). The 200 Acre campus for Indian Institute of Management, Lucknow is a blue print of an Indian Institution having derived inspiration from the traditional architectural elements with a futuristic vision. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Asian Paints Factory, Uttar Pradesh, 1988
Asian Paints Factory, Uttar Pradesh, 1988: The plant has a large number of complex plant buildings such as paint house, resin house, industrial paint units, raw material and finished goods warehouses and non-plant buildings such as the canteen. Industrial buildings in this complex have been provided with a climatically designed solution like offsetting the main structure with corridors and exterior wall treatments with soothing colours and materials © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Army College Of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, 2010
Army College Of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, 2010: The site is located along the western slope of the Central Ridge of Delhi in an eco-sensitive zone. Therefore the primary design approach aimed to merge the architecture of the buildings harmoniously with the natural landscape around. The built forms were chosen to be organic and flowing, incorporating the existing trees on the site creating a dual sense of an enclosure defined by hard walls and soft foliage. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Army College Of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, 2010
Army College Of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, 2010: The chief material chosen for construction was that of exposed bricks which have long been a preferred choice of material for architectural design of institutional projects in Delhi. The client’s desire to have a glass façade, however, was addressed by creating a curtain glazing on the northern side and has been complemented with a brick façade to help the design to evoke an institutional sense to the building. Among the facilities, alongside the college campus, the 1200 seater Auditorium and a hostel for 600 students contributes significantly to the architectural form and function of the Complex. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Pathways School, Gurugram, 2010
Pathways School, Gurugram, 2010: Pathways World School is situated on a rocky, hilly site in the Aravali hills. It was designed with special care to the fragile ecosystem of the area, and with careful consideration to the natural topography of the site. A lake has been created in major natural depression, becoming the central focus of the campus. It collects all the water runoff and therefore serves as a water resource in case of fire since the site is in a remote location. All the buildings are configured in a circular manner around this reservoir and are strung together by a colonnade, which is the circulation spine. Started in 2002, it has been recognized as the first Platinum rated institutional project in the country. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Management Development Institute, Gurugram, 1973
Management Development Institute, Gurugram, 1973: Inspired by the planning principles of Takshila, Nalanda and Vikramshila, the Management Development Institute has been planned along two axes. All the major academic blocks and hostel accommodation run along the Primary Axis, while all the ancillary functions such as the faculty residences and club facilities have been placed along a Secondary Axis. This planning style adopts a clear circulation pattern and demarcation of functions. The architectural composition of the built complex has been planned as a system of courtyards. The double storeyed blocks in exposed clay brickwork appear as an extension of the ground from which it arises. Wide, arcaded corridors run all along the courtyards, while lattices, coffers and pergolas add porosity into the otherwise bold and sturdy architecture of exposed bricks. The landscape chiefly aims to create a hierarchy in the degree of “publicness” and “private-ness” through the use of large, expansive lawns, shrubs and dense foliage. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Rumtek Monastery, New Delhi, 1989
Rumtek Monastery, New Delhi, 1989: The design of the buildings is inspired by the Rumtek Monastery in Gangtok. It was built because access to Sikkim was highly restricted at that time. The distribution of rooms in the building and its intricate decorations are both in a manner and in materials dictated by traditional religious tenets. This project placed a special focus on sustainability, as natural dyes and pigments were used to paint the building, instead of synthetic paints. © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
Rumtek Monastery, New Delhi, 1989
Rumtek Monastery, New Delhi, 1989 © CP Kukreja Archives/Sushant School of Art and Architecture, Ansal University
  • Advisor: Dr Vibhuti Sachdev
  • Curation: Aruna Bhardwaj, Bhawna Dandona, Nidhi Dandona, Rahat Varma
  • Collateral and Media: Gautam Malik, Meenakshi Dubey, Parshati Dutta, Rahat Varma, Sagar Gupta
  • Support: Ashish, Himanshu Sanghani, Jagdish Prasad Mishra, Kiran, Parul Sharma, Ramadass Bama Thiruvengadam , Saloni Makkar, Sanjay Kumar, Shubhankar Thakur, Sudar Oli Gunasekaran, Suruchi Modi
  • Students:  Aadya Garg, Advita Bansal, Akash Saxena, Akhila Pentrala, Amitoz Pal Singh Boonga, Anand Mohan Bajpai, Archita Gupta, Ashni Jain, Dhriti Bisht, Divmeher Anand, Elvin Aby, Fizaa Lamba, Gandharva Garg, Manandeep Narag, Nandini Mohan, Pratyush Gupta, Rishab Rodrick, Roopank Bhardawaj, Savvy Jain, Shrey Kapur, Tripureshee Vashishtha, Zohra Fatima

Special Mention: Anand Bhatt, Ashish Aggarwal, Ashwini Kher, Arunima Kukreja, Dikshu Kukreja, Gaurav Sanan, Kshitij Rana, Manoj Mathur, Megha Balooni, Ram Dandona, Sanjay Kanvinde, Sameer Divekar, S K Nandi, Suneet Paul, Veena Gautam, Vijay Garg