The off-the-grid solar home would imperceptibly spin on its central axis, providing fresh views with each season.

A big, rubber kickball that’s been blasted with a shotgun and is in the process of deflating—that’s what we could all soon be living in, to believe the winner of a design competition envisioning the “house of the future.”

The “Hollywood” contest, put on by the Denver-based architectural-research group Arch Out Loud, invited architects and visionaries to submit concepts for a revolutionary single-family domicile that uses environmentally friendly technology. The house would sit on a parcel of land right below the famous HOLLYWOOD sign, owned by a New York dentist who grew up in California named Steve Alper. “The idea for a competition came from Steve recognizing that such a prominent location needs a story, and its design should make a statement beyond another luxury home in the Hollywood Hills,” says Arch Out Loud’s Nick Graham. “The location can serve as a platform and its architecture a precedent for sustainability, future lifestyle, and iconic architecture.”

Out of 500 entries, local firm Hirsuta emerged victorious with its concept for an “Ambivalent House,” which definitely satisfies the competition’s request for innovation. For one thing, it spins: Hidden mechanical systems would gradually rotate its outer husk—perhaps 360 degrees over the course of a year—so passersby would never see it the same way twice.