Archaeologists in Egypt have discovered a 4,400-year-old tomb near the country's famed pyramids at the Giza plateau just outside Cairo, the Antiquities Ministry said Saturday, the latest discovery that authorities hope will help revive the country's staggering tourism sector.

This image taken from video on Saturday, Feb. 3, 2018, shows wall paintings inside a 4,400-year-old tomb near the pyramids outside Cairo.
This image taken from video on Saturday, Feb. 3, 2018, shows wall paintings inside a 4,400-year-old tomb near the pyramids outside Cairo. © Associated Press - The tomb likely belonged to a high-ranking official known as Hetpet during the fifth dynasty of ancient Egypt, officials said.

The tomb was found in a wider area of Giza's western necropolis, which is known to be home to tombs from the Old Kingdom.

It likely belonged to a woman known as Hetpet, who archaeologists believe was close to ancient Egyptian royals of the fifth dynasty.

The tomb, unveiled to the media Saturday, is made of mud brick and includes wall paintings in good condition depicting Hetpet observing different hunting and fishing scenes.

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According to the ministry, the archaeological mission behind the discovery started excavation work in October. Archaeologists have been making discoveries near the site since the 19th century, and Mustafa Waziri, who led the mission, believes there is still more to be found.

"This is a very promising area. We expect to find more," Waziri told reporters at the site. "We have removed between 250 and 300 cubic meters of layers of earth to find the tomb.

"What we see above the earth's surface in Egypt doesn't exceed 40% of what the core holds," he added.

Waziri believes Hetpet had another tomb in Giza's western necropolis and said that excavation work is underway to find that one too.

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