Jogeshwari, created around 1,500 years ago, is a rock-cut cave shrine to
the Hindu god Shiva. In its scale, the cave complex rivals several
UNESCO World Heritage sites nearby: the spectacular cave temples of
Ajanta, Elephanta, and Ellora. In its design and ornamentation,
Jogeshwari is transitional, with features reminiscent of older Buddhist
caves and Hindu statues less refined than those that would appear
later--a missing link in an evolutionary chain. "It connects the
greatest Buddhist monument [Ajanta] with what many would say is the
greatest Hindu monument [Elephanta]," says Walter Spink, an art
historian at the University of Michigan who has studied Indian cave
temples for decades. Jogeshwari's archaeological and art historical
importance is matched only by its advanced state of neglect. Until
recently, it was filled with garbage and squatters, and now the slum
above closes in tighter and sewage leaks down the walls. Overlooked by
scholars, neglected by the ASI, and forgotten by the people of Mumbai,
Jogeshwari languishes while its progeny, the spectacular cave on
Elephanta Island in Mumbai Harbor, has become one of the city's most
visited and treasured tourist destinations.

cont'd....
http://www.archaeology.org/0705/abstracts/cave.html

===================================

The tradition of Hindu rock-cut cave temples begins in the early sixth
century A.D. and quickly reached grand scale with the spectacular caves
at Elephanta on an island in Mumbai (Bombay) Harbor. Two caves within
Mumbai represent the early examples and are largely forgotten and
neglected despite their archaeological importance. Where Jogeshwari
("The Slum and the Sacred Cave," May/June 2007) languishes under a slum,
Mandapeshwar, which is cut from a basalt outcropping called Mount
Poinsur, is merely adjacent to one in Mumbai's Borivali suburb. The open
area in front of the cave is a popular meeting place and cricket pitch
for the local kids...

cont'd....
http://www.archaeology.org/online/features/mandapeshwar/